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Its possible upgrade to MariaDB?

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  • Its possible upgrade to MariaDB?

    Hello.
    A few weeks ago I convert all my tables (except the tables aren't possible) to innodb, all fine.
    Now I view or I think in upgrade to MariaDB.
    vBulletin 4.2.5 works fine with MariaDB or Mysql 8.0?

    Thanks and regards.

  • #2
    MariaDB is more of a sidegrade. It is doubtful that it will give any significant performance benefit over MySQL 5.7. You can use MySQL 8.0 as long as you use mysql_native_password. PHP doesn't understand the new password schema in MySQL 8.0.
    Translations provided by Google.

    Wayne Luke
    The Rabid Badger - a vBulletin Cloud customization and demonstration site.
    vBulletin 5 Documentation - Updated every Friday. Report issues here.
    vBulletin 5 API - Full / Mobile
    I am not currently available for vB Messenger Chats.

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    • #3
      Thanks Wayne.
      Then, MariaDB it is discarded a priori, but work with vb 4.2.5 with no more resources? Mysql 8.0 I view that I need use with mysql_native_password...

      This question its because, I view a one new server for my site, I view that, by default, have MariaDB, but not Mysql (but I can install mysql), then, I think in upgrade to MariaDB and then, migrate the server, or in the new server install Mysql 5.7 or 8.0.

      For this, I think what, install mysql 5.7, or 5.8 or not and use MariaDB in new server...

      Again, thank you Wayne.

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      • #4
        I'm running vBulletin 4.2.5 with MariaDB10.2.23. No problems or issues.
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        • #5
          Originally posted by djbaxter View Post
          I'm running vBulletin 4.2.5 with MariaDB10.2.23. No problems or issues.
          Thanks for the info.
          After read your reply, I update to MariaDB 10.2.23, also, no problems or issues.

          Then, I have a doubt, my WHM recommended upgrade to MariaDB 10.3, are some difference betwen 10.2 with 10.3? If its compatible vb 4.2.5 with MariaDB 10.3 I go to upgrade to MariaDB 10.3 but I'm not sure...

          Thanks and regards.

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          • #6
            First the question of why switch from MySQL to MariaDB at all. The short answer is improved speed and performance:

            MySQL Performance: MySQL vs. MariaDB | Liquid Web Knowledge Base

            MariaDB is mostly a clone of MySQL, but it also provides several improvements over running the standard MySQL instance. MariaDB aims for a drop-in replacement to MySQL, which makes the switch painless and straightforward. Combine the simplicity of switching with a long list of improvements, MariaDB brings both performance and cutting-edge features to the table. Below are some of its selling points over standard MySQL.

            More Storage Engines Options: There is 12 new storage engine built into MariaDB. Among these are CONNECT, Spider, and SphinxSE. Visit their Storage Engines page for a complete list of these engines, how they function, and ways to leverage them to optimize your database.

            Speed improvements: MariaDB sports many new speed improvements compared directly with standard MySQL. This improved performance makes MariaDB stand apart from the baseline performance of traditional MySQL servers. Like MySQL, MariaDB has dozens of features for speed optimization including disk access, JOIN and EXPLAIN improvements, subquery, derived tables/views, execution control, and optimizer control.

            Faster Indexes/Cache: When using the MEMORY storage engine, MariaDB can complete INSERT statements up to 24% faster than traditional MySQL servers, along with CHECKSUM TABLE and MyISAM Segment Key Cache being 4x faster.

            Speedier and Larger Connection Pool: MariaDB benefits from an improved pool of threads that run faster and support up to 200,000+ connections where standard MySQL falls short.

            Improved Replication: MariaDB sports faster and safer replication with updates being up to 2x faster than with traditional MySQL Replication setups. Now possible, parallel replication allows the existence of Active/Active or Master/Master configurations. MariaDB replication is backward compatible with MySQL servers, so migrating your cluster to MariaDB is possible by utilizing one node at a time.

            New Extensions/Features: There are several new extension and features, to name a few, the WITH, JSON and KILL statements. DECIMAL sees an increased from 30 to 38 decimals while KILL ALL queries for a specified user.

            List of Features: Available MariaDBís website is a comprehensive list of improvements and features, located here: MariaDB versus MySQL-Features.
            Downsides to MariaDB?

            What is the Downside to Using MariaDB?

            The MariaDB project is entirely open-source and free, unlike MySQL which uses dual licensing to keep its Enterprise edition specific features proprietary. The MariaDB developers actively update and enhance with cutting-edge features that standard MySQL does not carry.

            Missing Features: MySQL uses some proprietary code in its Enterprise Edition. MariaDB does not have access to this propriety content and is a closed source, meaning the features are only available to MySQL Enterprise users.

            Mitigation: MariaDB has addressed this concern through allowing viable open-source alternative plugins for MariaDB, providing the same functionality that the MySQL Enterprise Edition offers. This allows the vast majority of standard MySQL and MySQL Enterprise Edition users the option to switch to MariaDB, taking advantage of its robust performance enhancing features.

            Delayed MySQL Compatibility: MariaDB originally forked from MySQL 5.5, so this is the base starting point for the MariaDB source code. Meaning that newer features and bug fixes developed for standard MySQL after version 5.5 are not part of the existing MariaDB source code.

            Mitigation: MariaDB conducts monthly merges of the standard MySQL source code to ensure both compatibility and feature/bug-fix adoption. This kind of regular code merging, allows MariaDB to maintain its allure as a drop-in replacement for practically any existing versions of standard MySQL. However, there will always be a delay causing MariaDB to lag behind MySQLís newer features and bug patches.

            Differences in MariaDB versions?

            Generally point releases are fixes and improvements for stability and won't make a huge difference but I think the question is what will you gain? Probably not a whole lot, in which case it may not be worth the risk to you. On the other hand, there were apparently some security fixes but I don't know what those were or how much of a threat they pose.

            Disclaimer: I have only skimmed the documentation for MariaDB 10.3 so it's possible I've missed something. You can find that here if interested: Changes & Improvements in MariaDB 10.3 - MariaDB Knowledge Base

            That said, MariaDB 2.2.23 is still a long way away from end of life. MariaDB 2.5 (first stable release) was released on 23 May 2017, and version 2.2.23 was released on March 25, 2019. MariaDB guarantees support for each (major) release for a minimum of 5 years (they are actually still supporting MariaDB 5.5 until some time next year).

            I opted to change to MariaDB a few years ago largely because I wanted/needed the performance improvements and I've never encountered any issues as a result of that switch. However, I have no interest in upgrading to the latest releases just to have the latest releases and generally my policy is leave it alone unless you need to address an active security risk or you are having a specific problem that a later release fixes.

            However, I just checked now and I see that cPanel is recommending version 3 so I may do some further research myself. The additional factor, though, when you are using older software like vBulletin 4.2.5 is whether the newer version will create any issues for that specific version of vBulletin, so cPanel-recommended or not you may want to stay with MariaDB 2.2.23 until you get verification from someone using vBulletin 4.2.5 and MariaDB 3.x that their installation is working fine.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by djbaxter View Post
              I opted to change to MariaDB a few years ago largely because I wanted/needed the performance improvements and I've never encountered any issues as a result of that switch. However, I have no interest in upgrading to the latest releases just to have the latest releases and generally my policy is leave it alone unless you need to address an active security risk or you are having a specific problem that a later release fixes.
              In the little, very little time that I have been using MariaDB instead of MySQL I think I have noticed just what you are saying.

              However, I just checked now and I see that cPanel is recommending version 3 so I may do some further research myself.
              That was exactly the reason for my question. In my WHM it appears as recommended (or highly recommended) the new / last version for security improvements and other fixes.
              The additional factor, though, when you are using older software like vBulletin 4.2.5 is whether the newer version will create any issues for that specific version of vBulletin, so cPanel-recommended or not you may want to stay with MariaDB 2.2.23 until you get verification from someone using vBulletin 4.2.5 and MariaDB 3.x that their installation is working fine.
              But I think exactly like you.
              Does this update, using an old software such as vbulletin 4.2.5, create a problem?
              Therefore, my question.
              Faced with doubt, I can wait.
              I can also update (previous complete backup of the server) and do some tests myself, but my small tests will never be as total and reliable as that of all users who access the forum.

              For now, I will continue in the current version, to see if anyone can confirm that with that version and vb 4.2.5 it works well.

              I installed / updated MariaDB in the version indicated by your comment that was good for you, thanks for that and for your response!

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