I know it's hard to visualize the widgets when you can't see either what they look like or how you administer them. I've been holding off putting up screen shots, because none of the pages have been styled. The admin pages probably won't change much if at all, but the user-facing changes are getting a thorough facelift, both visually and in terms of the styling and templating. So please don't comment on how ugly the CMS page is. We know, and we've got all available hands working on it. But the screen shot does have the right elements in roughly the right order.

So the first screen shot shows the page where you set up the CMS page layout. This is a 75%/25% layout grid. We give you a number of options, and it's possible to create your own. Here I've put the content on the left, and two widgets on the right, for navigation and "my friends activity". This is all done with drag and drop. See the scrolling list of widgets on the left? You press the button to put one on the page, then drag it to the place you want it. You can have widgets on any of the columns, above or below the main content.

The second and third screen shots show widget configuration interfaces. Each widget type has it's own interface. To repeat, you create as many widgets as you want, each with it's own unique configuration. So for example you could have dozens of RSS feed widgets, each of is an RSSFeed widget type. Each has its own configuration, which for that widget is the URL of the feed. You then put each of those widgets onto one or more page layouts. Then when you create a CMS article you define the page layout.




The fourth page shows a CMS page. For this page I have turned the commenting on and made a couple of comments. You see the content in the center and left, extracts of the comments on the bottom with links to the discussion thread, the navigation widget at the top right, and below that the output of the "my friends" activity widget. In any real article of course the content would be more than two short sentences, but I wanted you to see everything at once.