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  • college ~ studying ~ tape/cd recorders?

    OK all you college student, past, present, and future? (well past and present anyway)

    Do any of you use tape or CD recorders to help you study, listen to lectures at home, etc? I am studying for some very rigorous tests in my field of expertise to get licensed and I have a hard time with reading comprehension. I am considering recording myself reading (most of it is tedious laws) and playing it back...

    What brand? What type? (is what I am wondering)

  • #2
    Nope, I usually don't record lectures and stuff.

    But if I do need to record something, I'll use my MP3 player. It's got amazingly good recording quality (MPIO FL-300).
    :)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by DirectPixel
      Nope, I usually don't record lectures and stuff.

      But if I do need to record something, I'll use my MP3 player. It's got amazingly good recording quality (MPIO FL-300).
      I am not very up-to-date on these new-fangled inventions...ROFL-at-my-self

      Would you recommend an MP3 player over a CD r/rw as a good option for recording conversations or lectures? what do you need besides the player? any certain software? hardware? really dumb about these things, sorry...

      Comment


      • #4
        Nope, all you need is a MP3 player that supports voice recording. Althought you might want to find one with good reviews for voice recording features.

        You usually don't need any special software. My MP3 just records the voices directly to files that I can then copy onto my computer via USB connection.
        :)

        Comment


        • #5
          Just a general question on how many of you take notes at lectures? I am more of a persistent learner -- if I have to memorize something I have to read it and repeat it numerous times (it is very effective as it is stuck in my mind -- but it is temporary, lol). I know alot of people are able to read the work and really understand it. I would like some tips, does recording help? Pencil and paper? Notebook? Any general tips would be fine.

          Sorry free-thinker for hi-jacking your thread

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Arunan
            Just a general question on how many of you take notes at lectures? I am more of a persistent learner -- if I have to memorize something I have to read it and repeat it numerous times (it is very effective as it is stuck in my mind -- but it is temporary, lol). I know alot of people are able to read the work and really understand it. I would like some tips, does recording help? Pencil and paper? Notebook? Any general tips would be fine.

            Sorry free-thinker for hi-jacking your thread
            Hmm... I'm not sure if this helps, but here's a story of how I recently studied for my Multivariable Calculus class.

            This class consisted of bi-weekly homework assignments (in which you were supposed to do a few problems each day and turn in the entire packet every other week) and three exams: two mid-terms and one final.

            What ended up happening for me was that I started sleeping through the classes, so eventually I didn't even bother waking up to go. All in all, I think I attended maybe 10 days of class out of an entire semester (mid-January to end of April).

            What I did for the homework was just copy the solutions from the solutions manual that I had. It allowed me to focus my attention on other classes (who wants to spend 2 hours doing Calculus homework everyday, anyways? ). It also gave me a sense of what's going to be on the test and where the class was that week.

            For the mid-terms, I usually took out about 7 to 8 hours to study for them the day before. Usually, I'd go from afternoon to midnight the day before the mid-term, and just go to the library and read the textbook. Every time the textbook presented a problem or gave a sample, I worked it out on a piece of paper, and kept on re-reading the same section until I fully understood it (math is the type of class where memorizing is completely useless. You've gotta understand it).

            For the final, which was cumulative, I ended up doing the same thing, except taking up three days (and about 21 to 24 hours of total study time).

            I was pretty surprised with how I did. I figured I'd get by with a 70 to 80 average (C or B), but ended up getting one of the highest grades in the class.

            Finding directional derivatives and parameterizing arclengths is fun!


            Forgot to mention: When reading the book, I'm always making an outline as I read along. Nothing detailed--just a list of section titles and perhaps a few essential equations. After I'm done with one part, I go back and review my outline. If I don't remember any part of that outline, I go back and re-read that part.
            Last edited by DirectPixel; Sat 30th Jul '05, 1:15pm.
            :)

            Comment


            • #7
              I use my tablet PC to take handwritten notes. Most tablets (including mine) have microphone arrays built in designed to record lectures and similar situations, although I don't use mine for that.

              The problem with making audio recordings is you have to listen to them in real-time, so recalling a 2 hour lecture takes 2 hours. You're also missing material drawn on an overhead, PowerPoint, whiteboard, etc. Finally, most people are visual learners, not auditory.
              --filburt1, vBulletin.org/vBulletinTemplates.com moderator
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              • #8
                Wow, that was pretty detailed...now how to make sure I read this everytime I have to do work -- I will subscribe to this thread.

                Also, the solution books, do you have to buy it seperately?
                Originally posted by DirectPixel
                Hmm... I'm not sure if this helps, but here's a story of how I recently studied for my Multivariable Calculus class.

                This class consisted of bi-weekly homework assignments (in which you were supposed to do a few problems each day and turn in the entire packet every other week) and three exams: two mid-terms and one final.

                What ended up happening for me was that I started sleeping through the classes, so eventually I didn't even bother waking up to go. All in all, I think I attended maybe 10 days of class out of an entire semester (mid-January to end of April).

                What I did for the homework was just copy the solutions from the solutions manual that I had. It allowed me to focus my attention on other classes (who wants to spend 2 hours doing Calculus homework everyday, anyways? ). It also gave me a sense of what's going to be on the test and where the class was that week.

                For the mid-terms, I usually took out about 7 to 8 hours to study for them the day before. Usually, I'd go from afternoon to midnight the day before the mid-term, and just go to the library and read the textbook. Every time the textbook presented a problem or gave a sample, I worked it out on a piece of paper, and kept on re-reading the same section until I fully understood it (math is the type of class where memorizing is completely useless. You've gotta understand it).

                For the finals, which was cumulative, I ended up doing the same thing, except taking up three days (and about 21 to 24 hours of total study time).

                I was pretty surprised with how I did. I figured I'd get by with a 70 to 80 average (C or B), but ended up getting one of the highest grades in the class.

                Finding directional dirivatives and parameterizing arclengths is fun!


                Forgot to mention: When reading the book, I'm always making an outline as I read along. Nothing detailed--just a list of section titles and perhaps a few essential equations. After I'm done with one part, I go back and review my outline. If I don't remember any part of that outline, I go back and re-read that part.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Arunan
                  Sorry free-thinker for hi-jacking your thread
                  Hey, no probs at all...

                  Actually after a lot of looking I found an AWESOME product that I just purchased. I found nothing but rave reviews on it, customer experiences, etc...

                  It is from Olympus. They carry a line of "Digital Voice Recorders", depending on your needs they have many to choose from. I chose the Model DS-330. Check it out HERE.

                  I am really psyched about how this could help me. I even got one for my GF, as she is in college, and both of us have a hard time studying from paper...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Arunan
                    Wow, that was pretty detailed...now how to make sure I read this everytime I have to do work -- I will subscribe to this thread.

                    Also, the solution books, do you have to buy it seperately?
                    Yes, the solution manual is a seperate book.
                    :)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by free thinker
                      Hey, no probs at all...

                      Actually after a lot of looking I found an AWESOME product that I just purchased. I found nothing but rave reviews on it, customer experiences, etc...

                      It is from Olympus. They carry a line of "Digital Voice Recorders", depending on your needs they have many to choose from. I chose the Model DS-330. Check it out HERE.

                      I am really psyched about how this could help me. I even got one for my GF, as she is in college, and both of us have a hard time studying from paper...
                      Recording lectures can be very useful, but be sure to ask your instructer for permission beforehand. While most professors will be more than happy to have their lectures recorded, I've had a few professors who are very apposed to recording lectures.

                      In that case, you've gotta be more discrete about it.
                      :)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DirectPixel
                        Recording lectures can be very useful, but be sure to ask your instructer for permission beforehand. While most professors will be more than happy to have their lectures recorded, I've had a few professors who are very apposed to recording lectures.

                        In that case, you've gotta be more discrete about it.
                        I'm using mine for personal studying, BUT I will DEFINITELY pass your advice along to my GF. Thankx!!!

                        Comment

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